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3 Reasons Dental Health Is More Important Than You Think

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We all know that dental hygiene is important for maintaining those pearly whites and that great smile, but what you may not know is that good dental health goes way beyond appearances. Regular dental checkups and a good dental hygiene routine is important not only for your teeth, but the rest of your body, as well. Not taking proper care of your teeth can lead to all sorts of other health issues, many of which go well beyond the teeth and gums. Keep reading to learn the three reasons your dental health may be more important than you think!

1. Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

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Periodontal disease (gum disease) can cause serious heart trouble, according to studies. The theory is that the bacteria that causes gum disease travels through the blood stream to other parts of the body, specifically your heart, which can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. Endocarditis (an infection of the lining of the heart) is also thought to be linked to gum disease. Regular dental checkups and sticking to a rigorous dental routine are important not only for your oral health, but your heart health, as well!

2. Oral Complications and Diabetes

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If you’re one of the millions of Americans living with diabetes, your oral health is more important than ever! Diabetes makes fighting infection even more difficult, which means your gums are even more susceptible to periodontal disease and other oral health complications. Daily brushing and flossing, along with regular visits to your dentist and keeping your blood glucose levels in check, is especially important for diabetics, in order to ward off oral health problems related to diabetes.

3. Possible Increased Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

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In the quest to find out what might cause Alzheimer’s, researchers at the University of Central Lancashire have pinpointed a specific bacterium (Porphyromonas gingivalis) in the brains of living dementia patients. The bacteria is associated with chronic periodontal disease (or gum disease), which creates a convincing link between chronic dental problems and conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Keeping up on your dental health means less invasive dental work that can release bacteria from the mouth into the bloodstream, which may be linked to Alzheimer’s and other dementia-like conditions. The lesson? Make your oral health a top priority!

Anna enjoys blogging about a variety of topics, from fashion and beauty to food and travel. Find Anna on LinkedIn!

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